Harold Irvin Banks

Judge says pedophile ‘paid his debt to society’

More than eight years after his release from prison, convicted bisexual pedophile Harold Irvin Banks has no restrictions on his activities as he lives out his remaining years in Courtenay.

More than eight years after his release from prison, convicted bisexual pedophile Harold Irvin Banks has no restrictions on his activities as he lives out his remaining years in Courtenay.

Banks, now 73 years old, had been living under a peace bond that ordered him not to contact his past victims. not to be in the company of anybody under the age of 16 and to report any intimate relationships to the court.

The peace bond was requested again this year but Judge Peter Doherty denied the request.

“Crown has come before this court year after year after year with a similar request,” said Doherty. “Year after year after year, Mr. Banks has kept his nose clean.

“He has paid his debt to society. He has been monitored for years without incident. People have examined him from head to toe and examined him in other ways as well. There is no serious concern that I can see.”

Banks was a principal and school teacher in Sooke for 24 years. He was arrested in Comox in November of 1987 when he returned for his father’s funeral.

In 1988, Banks was sentenced to 13 years in jail after pleading guilty to 13 sexual assaults, including buggery, rape and attempted bestiality. Police also found a calendar in which Banks detailed more than 1,000 sexual contacts with children.

He was also convicted of having a restricted, unregistered weapon and assault causing bodily harm.

Banks was granted day parole in 1993 after serving one-third of his sentence but it was revoked after a public outcry.

In 1996, after serving two-thirds of his sentence, he was released on statutory release and moved back to Courtenay.

But he was sent back to prison in January of 1999 after he volunteered to baby-sit a four-year-old boy, a violation of his release. He also tried to rent the upper level of his mother’s Courtenay home to a woman with two young children. He was released in June 2000.

When the decision not to issue a peace bond was rendered, Banks said: “Thank you your honour, you won’t see me back in this court.”

One thought on “Harold Irvin Banks”

  1. He was a creep when I was in elementary school but we were taught to respect our elders. That’s a load of crap!!!

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Provided by the Sexual Abuse Network of Canada